The X-File (No.17) - May 1997

The merry month of May delivered a bumper crop of 57 methods rung for the first time so qualification for inclusion in this team was pretty tough. However, a fine crop of "Darling Buds" survived the ordeal to make it to market.

Method

lh

FCH

Rung at

On

Conductor

Pg

Uvarovite

g

Kcd

Barrow Gurney

12/3/97

A J Cox

454

Ytterbite

c

Bac

Barrow Gurney

9/4/97

A J Cox

454

Milner

k1

BD (in), BDK1c (out)

Oxford

31/3/97

D G Hull

455

Cotteridge

a

BDcd (out)

Oxford

31/3/97

D G Hull

455

Old Milverton

m

?

Birmingham

19/4/97

D J Pipe

512

Cranesthorpe

h

?

Birmingham

19/4/97

D J Pipe

512

Ulrikakaka

a

c (out)

Oxford

21/4/97

N J Bailey

483

Bradman

f

cps

Sydney

30/4/97

W T Perrins

537

Uvarovite Surprise Major : x5x4.5x5.6x4x5x256x1 lh 18

A familiar theme from "Tone" this one, but one which has the quality to endure. Bristol above gives trusted music and a blue-line comfort factor. Beneath the wee bell Uvarovite has the pivot bell working with its two course bells on the front across the half-lead while adjacent coursing-pairs dodge in 3-4. This neatly delivers 6 xx78ís off the front. K falseness is bit of a smack in the teeth to a mortal composer, but all in a dayís work for AJC.

Ytterbite Surprise Major : 3x56.4.56x5.6x4x5x4x7 lh 12

An uncommon backwork similar to some of the early "element" methods gives good, albeit rather bunched, rollup potential. The frontwork is mainly treble-bobbing but offers 4 xx78ís off the front. With all the music concentrated in the middle of the course, use of bobs before to skip over the B falseness that occurs at the beginning and end of the course should allow for a music-box of a composition.

Milner Surprise Royal : x3x4x2x3.4x7.58.2x6.7x6.78.9 lh 10

The next two methods were rung in a shortened attempt to ring 33-Spliced all-the-work. The composition was presumably an in-vogue 9-part with part ends cycling on rounds. These compositions deliver a veritable orgy of rollups with well-chosen leads strategically placed delivering rollups in every part. "Designer" methods rung in this genre of composition will often have one sparkling lead but otherwise have a nasty blue-line and not be worthy of ringing as a single method. Milnerís rather tasty though. Wrong double-dodging at the start of the lead gives you all the music you could want at the back, and Bristol-style points either side of a half lead dodge on the front packs the music in on the front. The resulting blue-line is full of interest and not overly difficult. Too good to be true? It is. BD in-course falseness will stifle the composerís ambitions somewhat. A cyclical approach called for?

Cotteridge Surprise Royal : 3x3.4x2x3x4x5.36x6.7x6x7 lh 12

Now this has got the lot. Itís pure London (No.3) above with all the roll-up potential that that brings and has a pretty frontwork moulded around a half-lead à la Milner. But unlike Milner itís clean proof. A plan with no drawbacks. We reckon it would sound corkiní at Thatcham or the Bell Foundry. We dare you.

Old Milverton Alliance Fourteen : x5x4.5x5.36.47.58.6.7xTxEBx1 lh 1B

Cranesthorpe Alliance Fourteen : x5x4.5x5.36.47.58.6.70x9.0x0.EB.0x0x0.EB lh B

These two methods were rung in a peal of 5-Spliced Fourteen all-the-work. Moldy is under no illusions that anybody is going to rush out and ring peals in these methods but the innovation behind them deserves recognition and attention. A drawback of cyclical part-end peals is that the more bells on which you ring them, the more calls you need to get from one course to the following rotation. Not only does this leave less time ringing the courses you want to ring, but in order to obtain any music during the succession of calls, the methods used tend to be rather contrived and inelegant. The solution to the problem is to use an irregular "link" method which in one lead (24 changes in this case) jumps you from one course to a cyclical rotation of that course. Combining these methods with the reliable musicality of Bristol and Maypole, David Pipe has fashioned a peal with an unfeasibly high number of 10 bell rollups forwards and backwards off front and back which must have been as enjoyable to ring as it must also have been challenging. Cranesthorpe employs 10-bell wrong hunting on the front during the trebleís 20 blows in the back four places. Music at the back comes courtesy of a Bristol start before bells meander down to join in the fun at the front. Old Milverton is a little more subtle with Palgrave-esque backwork above what is essentially stretched Bristol work on the front. The result is terrific. This is pioneering stuff. Congratulations.

5018 Spliced Fourteen (in 5 methods)
Comp. D J Pipe

234567890ETAB  Old Milverton
42638507T9BEA  Cranesthorpe
3527496E8A0BT  Linx
24A5E39B7T608  Cranesthorpe
534B2TA0E8967  Old Milverton
4523ABET90786  Bristol
08T6B7395E4A2  Maypole
EA927465830BT  Maypole
3B5T4028A6E79  Bristol
67890ETAB2345

13 part.

Ulrikakaka Alliance Royal : x4x36.7.58.6x6.7.6x6.9 lh 12

Another alliance method that gets the treble to the back sharpish and then lets bells hunt around together on the front to give forwards and backwards rollups. The composition was obviously key here so Moldy really wanted to see those figures. Thanks to the wonders of the internet the composition was found, together with the statistic that 4.84% of the changes have 6-bell rollups in them! The line is fairly straightforward with two lots of fishtails above and wrong-hunting below. By using blocks of successive 8ths place calls to keep the same 6 bells on the front for an extended spell whenever it is advantageous to do so, the cyclical composition delivers 18 each of all the possible types of 6-bell rollups. Clever stuff. Mind you, a trick has been missed. If the final cross section is rung x6x instead of 6x6, all those 18s turn into 24s. Uvavu indeed Mr Bailey! And what about this footnote? Surely if Vic and Bob want to learn to ring, they can just call down the Dove from above and find a tower.

Bradman Alliance Major : x5x4.5.36.4.5x4.7 lh 12

For a moment I thought this was going to be another Fazeley Junction (X-file 16), but alas no. It has an odd number of changes in each half-lead but there the similarity ends. The line is pleasant enough and thereís no in-course falseness, so the Bristol start combined with hunting between points on the front should allow for a musical peal. So why the funny treble path? Obviously to get a required length. The first of two peals rung in the method was 6996 changes. But why? An evening with Wisden tells Moldy that Donald Bradman made 6996 test runs in his career. English fans have some easier targets to go for. Botham made 5200, Edrich 5138 and Atherton is currently on 5149. But no doubt weíll soon read of an extent of Hick Doubles being rung at St Mary-le-Mans!

This file is now closed.

"MOLDY"



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