The X-File (No.26) - February 1998

From time to time in the X-file we've included compositions of new methods, and, in order to provide an all-round quality service in the method-reviewing department, this is something of which we'd like to do more. It will help us, and our readers, to see how a method's potential has been exploited and, in some cases, explain why a method has been constructed in the way it has. Indeed, some methods which we might currently consign binwards might make it into the file if we have the composition too. That's not a promise though!

For us to be able to include compositions in the X-file, we are relying on you, the method designers and peal composers out there, to send in your creations. This should be done care of the Ringing World office, so why not send in the composition when you send in the peal report? Come on, let's see them!

There was innovation and excitement as well as some good "standard" methods in February. For the inside detail, read on:

Method

lh

FCH

Rung at

On

Conductor

Pg

Brave New World

2z

N/A

Reading

18/1/98

M B Davies

209

Farringdon

k

DET(in) BDa1(out)

London, St Sepulchre

17/1/98

S A Coaker

163

Handcross

a

BDac

Fairwarp

2/2/98

D D Smith

213

Middlewich

h

BDEc

Southam

13/12/97

D Mottershead

214

St Olave

f

Ba2c(out)

Egham

24/1/98

P N Mounsey

212

Turners Hill

h

ac

Turners Hill

5/1/98

D D Smith

140

Brave New World Bob Royal : x4.58.1.3478.1.36.7x9.678.5.6.5x6.5.6.345.2

Manic Mark has already taken the trouble to tell us all why Brave New World really is the best thing since spliced [sic] bread, so there's little point in me saying more. If I were to be less positive about this innovative production, I could say that methods like this are often excellent in the plain course, but lose something once the coursing order is modified. The composition used [see also pg 209], however, does seem to compliment the method reasonably well and the band will definitely have had 3 hours of great fun. There must be plenty of methods out there, with similar features, just waiting to be discovered - for my money one without all those adjacent places would really steal the show. Again please!

Farringdon Alliance Maximus : x34x4x2.5.6x58.4.7x78x9.70.8.90.1 lh 1T

Farringdon is one of those methods designed to produce sparkling leads full of roll-ups in peals of spliced with part-ends cycling on rounds (so, just like Brave New World really). Despite this it's a good method in its own right, its main feature being lots of double-fishtails around the lead-end and half-lead. Plenty of roll-ups are generated at the back and the front and these are distributed fairly well across the whole course, although inevitably with a method designed for this purpose some leads are significantly better than others. This is probably worth ringing to a peal on its own, but some horrid falseness will make a decent composition difficult to find. Best stick to spliced.

Farringdon was rung in a peal with another of those clever 'link' methods that modifies the coursing order and gets you to the next part end quickly (like Lynx [X-file 8]). Where Lynx introduced some extra roll-ups into the bargain, Clink Little Bob goes for the 'let's do it as quick as possible' approach, thus achieving its aim, but with a distinct lack of finesse and subtlety. Still, each to their own.

Handcross Surprise Major : 5x34.6x56x3.2x4.5.4x2.5 lh 12

This sounds like what I do in handbell peals - well, it certainly makes the conductor cross. The above work is a subtle variant on a work we've seen a number of times recently, but with the 34 and 58 place notations swapped. The 8 roll-up positions are available, and plenty of music at the back should be able to be squeezed in, with the in-course falseness avoidable with short courses. On the front a combination of wrong-hunting and dodging over the half-lead (with places in 12) gives 2 5678s and 8765s, plus a 6578 and a 8756. Regrettably, these are all in the 4th lead which is likely to be missed out during most of the peal.

Middlewich Surprise Major : 36x56.4.5x5.6x4x5.4x56.7 lh 18

The backwork here needs no further explanation - it's pure Glasgow. The frontwork is characterised by points as the treble leaves 56, and wrong double-dodges over the half lead whilst the bells in 56 do places. The result is a flurry of 5 8765s in the 2nd lead, but whilst other leads do contain possibilities for music, the Cambridge-esque falseness imposes itself all over the place. Whether BYROC's algorithms could improve upon Charles Middleton's pencil we'll perhaps never know

St Olave Surprise Royal : 3x5.4x5x3x34x5x6x7.6x6.7 lh 12

This is obviously from the same stable as Quinquagesimus (X-file no.24) as it sports the same backwork, with its spiky start and its treble-bobby middle. The frontwork this time involves wrong-hunting on 6 bells, following points as the treble leaves 78. This doesn't allow quite enough time for a complete plain hunt on 6, so the plain course doesn't include any 567890s off the front (although there is a 098765). That said, putting the 5th into 4ths place or the 6th into 3rds will give 567890s in the 4th and 6th leads of the course respectively. There are no problems composition-wise, but all in all this method promises just a little more than it actually delivers.

Turners Hill Delight Major : x5x4.5x56.3x4x1.36.2.36.7 lh 18

If I wanted to prove once and for all that Delight methods are as good as (if not better than) Surprise methods, then I'd have definitely picked Turners Hill to illustrate the point. This really is class stuff and David Smith is to be congratulated on producing one of the best methods yet reviewed by the X-file. Let's just analyse the musical (or potentially musical) changes for starters:

Lead 1

12345678

Lead 2

15738264

Lead 3

18674523

Lead 4

14263857

Lead 5

13527486

Lead 6

17856342

Lead 7

16482735

Front

Back

Front

Back

Front

Back

Front

Back

Front

Back

Front

Back

Front

Back

5378

8735

5678

5378

8734

8756

8764

4678

 

8764

6478

6578

5678

5678

 

8735

8735

5678

4678

4678

5678

5378

 

8764

5678

The blue-line is interesting without being horrendously difficult, starting like Bristol above the treble whilst being somewhat nondescript below. And, remarkably, it's c.p.s. in-course so there's no problem with including all the music. Purists might argue that the appearance of non-coursing pairs in 78 when the treble is in 56 is a blemish, but they should really just go away and stop their foul whinging. This is excellent.

This file is now closed.

"MOLDY"



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